Journal of Drug Research in Ayurvedic Sciences

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VOLUME 4 , ISSUE 1 ( January–March, 2019 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Development and Standardization of Narayana Churna—A Polyherbal Ayurvedic Formulation

Anupam K Mangal, Rinku Tomer, Heena Jindal, Sreya Dutta, Himanshu Sharma, Bhagwan S Sharma, Kartar S Dhiman

Keywords : Pharmacognosy, Standard operating procedure, Standardization, Thin-layer chromatography,Narayana Churna

Citation Information : Mangal AK, Tomer R, Jindal H, Dutta S, Sharma H, Sharma BS, Dhiman KS. Development and Standardization of Narayana Churna—A Polyherbal Ayurvedic Formulation. J Drug Res Ayurvedic Sci 2019; 4 (1):22-28.

DOI: 10.5005/jdras-10059-0073

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 00-03-2019

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2019; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Aim: The present study aims to develop pharmacognostical standards, standard operating procedure (SOP), and analytical profiling including physicochemical analysis of Narayana Churna, a polyherbal Ayurvedic formulation. Materials and methods: The pharmacognostical (macroscopy, microscopy and powder drug analysis), thin layer chromatography (TLC), and quantitative physicochemical analysis including loss on drying, alcohol and water-soluble extractive values, total and acid-insoluble ash, and pH value were performed as per the standard procedures described in the Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India (API). The microbial limit, aflatoxins, heavy metals and pesticide residues were also analyzed. Results and discussion: Narayana Churna is of grayish-brown color with a slightly pungent taste. The powder microscopy revealed the presence of pentagonal/hexagonal/polygonal cork cells, polygonal pale green endosperm, oval/polygonal/irregular shaped stone cells, elongated and flat-shaped bordered pitted vessels, pitted tracheids, annular vessels, unicellular covering trichomes, prismatic crystals of calcium oxalate, starch grains and oil globules. The TLC fingerprint was developed using toluene:ethyl acetate:formic acid (6:4:1) as the solvent system. The standardized limits of the physicochemical parameters, microbial count, aflatoxins, heavy metals and pesticide residues were also laid down. Conclusion: This is the first ever attempt made in order to develop the SOP and standardized parameters of Narayana Churna. Thus, the present study would be useful as the standardized reference protocol for the identification and standardization of this formulation.


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