Journal of Drug Research in Ayurvedic Sciences

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VOLUME 3 , ISSUE 4 ( October-December, 2018 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Establishment of Quality Parameters for Flowers of Karanja [Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre] through Powder Microscopy and Phytochemical Studies

Rajesh Bolleddu, Sama Venkatesh, Bhargav Bhongiri, Subhose Varanasi

Keywords : Karanja flowers, Phytochemical analysis, Powder microscopy.,Fluorescence analysis

Citation Information : Bolleddu R, Venkatesh S, Bhongiri B, Varanasi S. Establishment of Quality Parameters for Flowers of Karanja [Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre] through Powder Microscopy and Phytochemical Studies. J Drug Res Ayurvedic Sci 2018; 3 (4):228-233.

DOI: 10.5005/jdras-10059-0056

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 00-12-2018

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2018; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Background: Karanja (Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre), generally known as “Indian beech,” is a plant of high medicinal importance, possessing several beneficial effects such as antimicrobial, wound healing, antipyretic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, gastroprotective, and neuroprotective, which is widely used in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Aim: The aim of this study is to establish the pharmacognostical and physicochemical standards for flowers of an ayurvedic plant, Karanja. Materials and methods: Pharmacognostical analysis was done by morphological, macroscopical, and powder microscopy. Physicochemical standards were established by ash values, extractive values, phytochemical screening, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods. Results and conclusion: Flower powder microscopy shows diagnostic characters like unicellular trichomes of different sizes and triangular-shaped pollen grains. Loss on drying value of flower powder was 9.7% w/w. Total ash values of drug were found to be 6.15% and acid insoluble ash 0.3% w/w with respect to air-dried crude drug. Water soluble and alcohol-soluble extractives were found to be 25.5 and 6.37% w/w, respectively. Phytochemical characterization of alcoholic extracts revealed the presence of phenols, flavonoids, alkaloids, glycosides, and steroids. Aqueous extract revealed the presence of proteins, carbohydrates, and saponins. Various powder microscopical and phytochemical studies observed in this study can serve as a valuable tool for the authentication of Karanja flowers.


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